libutron:

Tigre de Bali. Extinto en 1937 | ©Amaya Oyón/Artimalia 
Bali Tiger - Extinct in 1937
The Bali Tiger, Panthera tigris balica, was the smallest subspecies of the tiger Panthera tigris. Its weight did not exceed 100 kg. This subspecies lived on the Indonesian Island of Bali. As far as it is known its habitat was restricted to the shoreline region of the western part of the island.
The last Bali tigers lived in the north-western tip of the island. The last well-documented specimen was killed there at Sumbar Kima, West Bali, on 27th September 1937.
An exact date of extinction is unknown as throughout the 1940s reports persisted that tigers still lived on the island. These came from people considered to be reliable and they continued into the 1950s, though with a reducing frequency. One instance occurred in 1952 when a Dutch forestry officer reported seeing a Bali tiger. There have even sightings continued to surface in the 1970s. One suspected sighting was in a western reserve in 1970 and the Balinese Forestry workers reported another in 1972. Despite these positive reports it is almost certain that the Bali tiger is extinct and little chance it will ever be rediscovered. The remaining forest areas on Bali are simply no longer large enough to provide a tiger with the required shelter and food source.
References: [1] - [2]

libutron:

Tigre de Bali. Extinto en 1937 | ©Amaya Oyón/Artimalia 

Bali Tiger - Extinct in 1937

The Bali Tiger, Panthera tigris balica, was the smallest subspecies of the tiger Panthera tigris. Its weight did not exceed 100 kg. This subspecies lived on the Indonesian Island of Bali. As far as it is known its habitat was restricted to the shoreline region of the western part of the island.

The last Bali tigers lived in the north-western tip of the island. The last well-documented specimen was killed there at Sumbar Kima, West Bali, on 27th September 1937.

An exact date of extinction is unknown as throughout the 1940s reports persisted that tigers still lived on the island. These came from people considered to be reliable and they continued into the 1950s, though with a reducing frequency. One instance occurred in 1952 when a Dutch forestry officer reported seeing a Bali tiger. There have even sightings continued to surface in the 1970s. One suspected sighting was in a western reserve in 1970 and the Balinese Forestry workers reported another in 1972. Despite these positive reports it is almost certain that the Bali tiger is extinct and little chance it will ever be rediscovered. The remaining forest areas on Bali are simply no longer large enough to provide a tiger with the required shelter and food source.

References: [1] - [2]

360 notes 

npr:

Eagerly anticipating the release of Gone Girl? 
Stream the soundtrack now from NPR Music’s First Listen. 
Illustration: Courtesy of Rob Sheridan

npr:

Eagerly anticipating the release of Gone Girl?

Stream the soundtrack now from NPR Music’s First Listen

Illustration: Courtesy of Rob Sheridan

534 notes 

npr:

Imagine if you could see the pen Beethoven used to write his Symphony No. 5. Or the chisel Michelangelo used to sculpt his David. Art lovers find endless fascination in the materials of artists — a pen, a brush, even a rag can become sacred objects, humanizing a work of art.

And now, at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, visitors can see some of the materials that impressionist Mary Cassatt once used — three well-loved, large wooden boxes of pastels from distinguished Paris art supply stores. Each box is filled with stubby pieces of pastels, some worn down to half an inch, others almost untouched.

Now That’s An Artifact: See Mary Cassatt’s Pastels At The National Gallery

Photo credit: National Gallery of Art

2,432 notes 

historicaltimes:

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist, at the women’s right to vote march on Fifth Avenue in New York City. October 23, 1917

historicaltimes:

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist, at the women’s right to vote march on Fifth Avenue in New York City. October 23, 1917

2,187 notes 

nprmusic:

Watch R&B trio KING make a record lover’s paradise even better with stripped-down version of “Supernatural.”

807 notes 

npr:

A day before the Scottish referendum, NPR’s Europe Editor Kevin Beesley demonstrates the proper way to pronounce “Edinburgh” for our Snapchat Fact of the Day.

176 notes 

nprglobalhealth:

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn’t one size fits all.
Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.
A few studies have found that modest clothing is connected with a healthier body image. So Swami and one of his graduate students looked at whether the hijab protected women against the pressure to be thin.
Read more: Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women’s Body Image

nprglobalhealth:

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn’t one size fits all.

Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.

A few studies have found that modest clothing is connected with a healthier body image. So Swami and one of his graduate students looked at whether the hijab protected women against the pressure to be thin.

Read more: Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women’s Body Image

756 notes 

npr:

The peaches we eat today look very little like the first peaches planted. We can thank the Chinese farmers who first domesticated the fruit for kicking off the millennia of breeding for perfection.
The Perfect Summer Peach Wasn’t Always So Rosy
Courtesy of Jose Chaparro/University of Florida

npr:

The peaches we eat today look very little like the first peaches planted. We can thank the Chinese farmers who first domesticated the fruit for kicking off the millennia of breeding for perfection.

The Perfect Summer Peach Wasn’t Always So Rosy

Courtesy of Jose Chaparro/University of Florida

405 notes