propublica:

About a third of the contiguous U.S. was in at least moderate drought as of July 22.  (Source: The Upshot)

propublica:

About a third of the contiguous U.S. was in at least moderate drought as of July 22.  (Source: The Upshot)

343 notes 

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

18,633 notes 

skunkbear:

NASA engineers use origami as inspiration when they fold up solar panels for their trip to space. Shown here: the Miura fold. Once a piece of paper (or solar array) is all folded up, it can be completely unfolded in one smooth motion. You can read more about origami in space here, and learn how to do the Miura fold in this video:

Image: Astronaut Scott Parazynski repairs a damaged ISS solar panel (NASA)

1,097 notes 

99percentinvisible:

The water bottle cap that reminds you to drink every hour

I need this

3,837 notes 

Whenever some pays me even the slightest compliment

whatshouldwecallme:

Whoever can tell me what show this is from wins some Barry’s tea (that should be a big hint)

737 notes 

My attire

whatshouldwecallme:

When I go out:

At work:

Absolutely. Although to don’t have that much swagger when I go out

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npr:

"Food-Mood Connection: How You Eat Can Amp Up Or Tamp Down Stress" via Allison Aubrey
If you’re reaching for the potato chips when you’re stressed, then you’re not alone. In a national survey, more than one-third of participants said they alter their diets when they’re stressed, often turning to foods that comfort them. Doctors suggest links between our moods and what we eat –– so, next time, grab a couple pieces of dark chocolate instead. Nutrient-rich foods might just help you keep a cap on your stress.
– Alexander
Image: Meredith Rizzo/NPR

npr:

"Food-Mood Connection: How You Eat Can Amp Up Or Tamp Down Stress" via Allison Aubrey

If you’re reaching for the potato chips when you’re stressed, then you’re not alone. In a national survey, more than one-third of participants said they alter their diets when they’re stressed, often turning to foods that comfort them. Doctors suggest links between our moods and what we eat –– so, next time, grab a couple pieces of dark chocolate instead. Nutrient-rich foods might just help you keep a cap on your stress.

– Alexander

Image: Meredith Rizzo/NPR

603 notes 

nprontheroad:

Rio’s “Christ the Redeemer” statue is probably Brazil’s most famous landmark. It towers over the city, high atop Corcovado Mountain. For the past six months it’s undergone a restoration after a pair of lightning strikes damaged several of the “fingers” and the “head”. Today, during a heavy rain, several of Rio’s religious leaders celebrated the completion. Father Omar Raposo also talked about Brazil’s semifinal loss in the World Cup and the redemption that can happen from a loss. “Winning or losing, you shouldn’t let the defeats beat on your soul.”

nprontheroad:

Rio’s “Christ the Redeemer” statue is probably Brazil’s most famous landmark. It towers over the city, high atop Corcovado Mountain. For the past six months it’s undergone a restoration after a pair of lightning strikes damaged several of the “fingers” and the “head”. Today, during a heavy rain, several of Rio’s religious leaders celebrated the completion. Father Omar Raposo also talked about Brazil’s semifinal loss in the World Cup and the redemption that can happen from a loss. “Winning or losing, you shouldn’t let the defeats beat on your soul.”

250 notes