nprmusic:

Watch R&B trio KING make a record lover’s paradise even better with stripped-down version of “Supernatural.”

777 notes 

npr:

A day before the Scottish referendum, NPR’s Europe Editor Kevin Beesley demonstrates the proper way to pronounce “Edinburgh” for our Snapchat Fact of the Day.

174 notes 

nprglobalhealth:

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn’t one size fits all.
Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.
A few studies have found that modest clothing is connected with a healthier body image. So Swami and one of his graduate students looked at whether the hijab protected women against the pressure to be thin.
Read more: Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women’s Body Image

nprglobalhealth:

Like any piece of clothing, the hijab isn’t one size fits all.

Women around the world choose to wear — or not to wear — a headscarf or veil for many reasons.

A few studies have found that modest clothing is connected with a healthier body image. So Swami and one of his graduate students looked at whether the hijab protected women against the pressure to be thin.

Read more: Covering Up With The Hijab May Aid Women’s Body Image

726 notes 

npr:

The peaches we eat today look very little like the first peaches planted. We can thank the Chinese farmers who first domesticated the fruit for kicking off the millennia of breeding for perfection.
The Perfect Summer Peach Wasn’t Always So Rosy
Courtesy of Jose Chaparro/University of Florida

npr:

The peaches we eat today look very little like the first peaches planted. We can thank the Chinese farmers who first domesticated the fruit for kicking off the millennia of breeding for perfection.

The Perfect Summer Peach Wasn’t Always So Rosy

Courtesy of Jose Chaparro/University of Florida

397 notes 

npr:

ari-abroad:

image

On September 18th, Scotland will vote on whether to secede from the UK. Polls suggest it could be a cliffhanger.

I’ve made several reporting trips to Scotland over the last few months, looking at different aspects of the debate. Here are links to some of the stories you may have missed:

A handy guide leading up to the Scottish independence vote compiled by NPR’s London correspondent, Ari Shapiro.

932 notes 

nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts
It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.
The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.
Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.
The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.
These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.
As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.
"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.
Continue reading.
Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)

nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts

It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.

Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.

The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.

These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.

As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.

"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.

Continue reading.

Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)

1,014 notes 

npr:

Rivers was a show business survivor whose tireless work ethic kept her relevant long after other comics would have faded away. She died Thursday at 81.

Joan Rivers, An Enduring Comic Who Turned Tragedy Into Showbiz Success, Dies

Photo credit: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for GLOBAL GREEN USA

RIP

876 notes 

nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts
It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.
The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.
Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.
The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.
These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.
As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.
"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.
Continue reading.
Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)


That’s good to know…. But we’ll see about that

nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts

It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.

Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.

The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.

These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.

As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.

"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.

Continue reading.

Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)

That’s good to know…. But we’ll see about that

1,014 notes 

shumbodynamedharry:

Misty Copeland breaking stereotypes in her Under Armour campaign. Inspirational.

434 notes